Rare Golf Memorabilia Auction by Lyon & Turnbull

July 15, 2015, at 7:30pm

The Rare Golf Memorabilia auction by Lyon & Turnbull,  will be held on July 15, 2015, at 7:30pm BST, and live online bidding will be held by  Invaluable.com. The auction will feature a selection of noteworthy auction lots. The sale will feature 37 lots of rare golf memorabilia, including beautiful paintings of the Old Course at St. Andrews, a ball signed by Payne Stewart, as well as a trophy that was presented to Gene Sarazen.”…which will be held on July 15, 2015, at 7:30pm BST, and live online bidding will be held by  Invaluable.com. The auction will feature a selection of noteworthy auction lots.”

Here are some of the items that will be part of the auction:

Gene Sarazen Masters Club
Lot 35: Masters Club, Augusta – A Rare First Presentation Piece Given To Gene Sarazen By Ben Hogan In 1952 4cm wide.

Estimated Price: £20,000 – £30,000

A rare piece presented to 1935 Masters winner, Gene Sarazen – the only player to win the Grand Slam. Tri-fold piece with picture of the club house inside the first leaf, inscribed “Gene Sarazen Member Masters Club August Georgia, next leaf inscribed “Ben Hogan Founder Clifford Roberts, Honorary Member Robert Tyre Jones Jr., Honorary Member, final leaf shows portrait of Hogan, initials “G.S.” inscribed on rear, clasp and hoop intact. 4cm wide.

Stars and Stripes Ball
Lot 20: A Rare Stars And Stripes Ball By Willie Dunn, 1897

Estimated Price: £20,000 – £30,000Ball stamped “Willie Dunn’s Stars and Stripes” , with alternative star and stripes around the ball.

One of only twelve reported to have been made. One currently resides in the USGA collection, the rest split between just two private collections. This is a rare chance to own one of the world’s most collectible golf balls.

Swilcan Bridge
Lot 4: Stephen Shankland (Scottish, Born 1971) St. Andrews, Swilcan Bridge 35cm by 52cm

Estimated Price: £3,000 – £4,000
St. Andrews, Swilcan Bridge, oil on board, initialed, c.2009 35cm by 52cm.
Beautiful painting of the iconic Swilcan Bridge from the Old Course at St. Andrews.

Payne Stewart Golf Ball
Lot 16: Payne Stewart – Signed Golf Ball

Estimated Price: £200 – £300

Signed Golf ball by Payne Stewart. Stewart won eleven PGA Tour events, including three major championships in his career, the last of which occurred only months before he died in an airplane accident at the age of 42.

Feel free to check out other memorabilia and collectibles up for auction.

UK Golfers, You’re in Luck

 Links Golf Course, Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius

Links Golf Course, Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius – photo taken from www.letsgo2.com

UK golfers, you’re in luck!

Letsgo2.com, a UK based holiday provider specialising in luxury bespoke package holidays to a variety of exotic destinations, aimed at the discerning traveller, is offering Travelling Golfer’s readers two holiday discount codes to be used for your summer holiday booking when you purchase a package holiday with them.

There are six golf resorts from the Middle East to the Indian Ocean available from Letsgo2.com for you and your family to choose from to have a nice getaway in the summer.

Quote one of the discount codes below when booking:

GOLF50 for £50 discount on holiday over £2,999
GOLF75 for £75 discount on holiday package over £3,000

The codes would not just be limited to use on the golf packages but would be valid site-wide


Function18 Launch Online Promotion to Celebrate the 2014 Masters

Online golf clothing store Function 18 has today announced the launch of their anticipated Masters promotion.

With 10% off all orders over £10 and 15% off all orders over £100, now is the perfect time to stock up on your golf clothing & accessories in time for the summer season.

The promotion is available across all major golf brands available online at Function18 including Oscar Jacobson, Nike Golf, Puma Golf, Adidas Golf and Hugo Boss, and will run throughout the Masters tournament until Sunday 13th April.

Take advantage of this great promotion this weekend and visit www.function18.com

Function 18's Masters Promotion

Golf Lessons Have Advanced Within the Last Decade

Golf Technology

The way people take golf lessons has advanced massively within the last decade giving today’s amateur golfer a much better chance of both understanding and improving their swing.

Previously golfers would be forced to rely solely on instruction given by their local golf professional. The problem with this is although the pro might get their student to swing well whilst in the lesson the student would have to rely heavily to learn and remember solely from feel, usually ending up in the pro manipulating the students arms, body and club.

Learning from feel is still a big part of teaching golf but today’s technology has made this aspect of learning a lot easier. Nowadays most teaching professions will use slow motion video technology within their lessons allowing the student to actually see and understand what is happening throughout the different stages of their swing.

Another benefit of new lesson technology now allows golfers to take their lessons home with them. With the introduction of high speed video recording a lot of pros now record lessons and use that recording to summarize what was worked on within the lesson and what should be worked on after the lesson. Pros can now include certain drills or swing thoughts which their students can refer back to whenever needed. Many amateurs benefit greatly from this as recapping on swing thoughts before a practise session or round can help focus the mind. That being said I do strongly believe that it’s important not to have too many swing thoughts as this can have a negative effect.

Online golf lessons now play a big part in the learning process as amateur golfers can now receive golf lessons without even having to leave their home. Advancing technology in smartphones and apps has made it easy for the average person to capture their swing with great precision. Golfers can now use that swing recording, sending it to pros who analyze the video and give a detailed analysis of swing faults and instruction on how to correct them. These types of lessons are becoming more and more popular as the cost of an online golf lessons is often far less than a traditional golf lesson.

Written by Dan Parker

Dan loves everything about the game of golf and gets out on the course whenever he gets the chance. Dan is also the Director at www.pros4golfers.com

On Rabbit’s Feet and Water Balls: A Look at Popular Golf Superstitions

Golf ImageBy Scott McCormick, a golfer and blogger with Golf Now Dallas.

Even professionals will admit that a little bit of luck can go a long way in golf. Don’t get me wrong – skill, focus, and intense training are all necessary to be at one’s peak. But at the end of the day, the odds of sinking a tiny ball in a tiny hole hundreds of yards away can leave one thinking that there’s more at play in the air other than wind resistance. Sports are often prone to superstitions, but golf is absolutely rife with them. The game’s most popular golfer, Tiger Woods, admits his iconic red shirt is actually a habit of superstition since his mother apparently warned him that wearing red on Sundays would boost his game – being the Capricorn that he is.

Here are some of the most prevalent myths in the game of golf, along with some analysis about how they might have started.

Hazard Balls Carry Bad Mojo

For a variety of reasons, many golfers have acquired the notion that using a ball that has been involved in a hazard shot might result in further hazards down the road. This holds especially true for balls that have unfortunately landed in a water hazard – many pros refer to these balls begrudgingly as “water balls” and will refrain from using them on any further holes for their round. On the other hand, some refuse to brush the dirt off if they’re in the middle of a lucky streak, since they believe that washing their ball will result in changing their luck.

The reason for the belief that balls can carry bad mojo can hinge on several reasons. For some, blaming the “energy” of a ball rather than other factors in the environment can help them explain the lack of consistency in the results of their swing. Others might consider these failings as due to minute differences between balls, despite the fact that they mostly seem identical. Regardless, most golfers aren’t willing to compromise logic when a gut feeling is saying that a ball has bad luck written all over it.

Don’t “Cheap Out”

When it comes to marking where your ball lies, the traditional decision has always been to use a quarter. But more than a simple tradition, many golfers refuse to use any other coinage (meaning going cheap with a penny or dime could spell disaster for your game.) And many golfers regard other balls found in sand traps or left abandoned out-of-bounds of the course to be similarly jinxed as previously stated, and they typically avoid picking them up. But instead of being based on mojo, many people regard this as unsportsman-like.

Despite clichés about golfers being well-to-do, the real basis of these superstitions doesn’t have anything to do with avoiding being a cheapskate; it’s that these practices further standardize the game and make elements of it feel more “controllable.” In a game in which so much is left to the wind (literally,) sports psychologists have recognized the trend of superstitions such as these arising as a means of assuming control over elements of the game in which they have little influence. Further superstitions along these lines hinge on lucky clubs, which players might bring along even if they remain unused. Others might bring lucky charms to focus on, which could boost their confidence when heading up for the tee-off.

The End Game

Regardless of the reasons that we hold these superstitions, the truth is that most of us are fully aware that they are arbitrary and baseless. The habits of seasoned vets may confound rookies who haven’t been in the game for long, but these routines have an important place in maintaining our emotional health while playing the game. The stresses of competition and performance anxiety can take a huge toll on us, but regaining control through these small quirks can be a great way to alleviate our minds and improve our game.
And as long as these practices aren’t inappropriate or too off-the-wall, who’s to say what’s in bounds?

Image Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/raysawhill/8306067796/