Don’t Let Back Pain Cost You a Stroke

Golf Back Pain
 

Once you hit the 30 year-old mark, inevitably you’re going to start experiencing some back pain. There are just a few parts of our bodies that weren’t built properly, and the back certainly falls in that category.

Back pain doesn’t need to be the downfall of your handicap, though. There’s no need to ‘Pull a Tiger‘ and bow out of the round. As long as you prepare properly and manage your back pain according to this advice, you shouldn’t even have to shed a stroke off your round.

1. Take the Torque Off Your Back
We all like the crush the ball off the tee, and in order to do this, we swing hard. We build club head speed by rapidly rotating our shoulders, hips, and back during our swing, which causes a lot of stress on our lower back. Go to the range, and start practicing a fluid, smooth swing. By rotating your entire body in a more fluid motion, you’ll feel the pressure ease on your lower back, and much of that energy will be transferred into your shoulders and hips.

At first, it’s going to be frustrating as you may feel like you’re losing power. It takes time to get comfortable with a fluid swing, especially if you’re accustomed to a hard, rapid stroke (which probably caused your back pain to start).

2. Stretch and Warm Up Properly
The worse thing you can do for your back is to show up right at tee time after a 30 minute drive in your car, and start swinging your driver off the tee box. It’s extremely important to stretch out for at least 10 minutes before even hitting a ball. There are great devices on the market, such as the Trueback, built to help alleviate back pain, and stretch out the spine. If you use the Trueback for 10 minutes before your round, and 10 minutes after, much of the pain and stress will be alleviated.

It’s also important to stretch your hamstrings, allowing for fluid hip rotation. The old-fashion ‘bend over and touch your toes’ will work to loosen up these muscles before the round.

3. Don’t Fight Your Loss of Power, Just Club Up
As I mentioned, you’re going to need to smooth out your swing in order to prevent that unnecessary strain on the lower back. So if you used to be able to smack your 9 Iron 150 yards, you may have to start using the 8 or 7 for these shots. Don’t let that frustrate you, just look at it as an opportunity to improve upon your accuracy from this range.

4. Listen to Your Body
Your back may feel fine on the front, but 18 might just be a stretch. Don’t push yourself past your limits. If you’re starting to feel some of the lingering pain, rest a few holes and see how you feel, and if the pain is still there, call it a day. There’s no need to push your self hard on a single round, and then pay for it for the rest of the week.
Back pain is awful, but there’s no reason to let it ruin your favorite sport, and there’s no reason to let your favorite sport ruin your back. Stretch properly, slow down your swing, and manage your pain properly. And you’ll be more confident than ever to bet big on your game!

UK Golfers, You’re in Luck

 Links Golf Course, Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius

Links Golf Course, Constance Belle Mare Plage, Mauritius – photo taken from www.letsgo2.com

UK golfers, you’re in luck!

Letsgo2.com, a UK based holiday provider specialising in luxury bespoke package holidays to a variety of exotic destinations, aimed at the discerning traveller, is offering Travelling Golfer’s readers two holiday discount codes to be used for your summer holiday booking when you purchase a package holiday with them.

There are six golf resorts from the Middle East to the Indian Ocean available from Letsgo2.com for you and your family to choose from to have a nice getaway in the summer.

Quote one of the discount codes below when booking:

GOLF50 for £50 discount on holiday over £2,999
GOLF75 for £75 discount on holiday package over £3,000

The codes would not just be limited to use on the golf packages but would be valid site-wide

 

Why Links Golf Courses Are The Best To Play

Why Links Golf Courses are the Best to Play
 

When we think of the British Open we think of history, we think of the likes of Jack Nicklaus, Tom Watson, Gary Player, and of course the likes of St Andrews, Royal St George’s and Muirfield.

This year the circuit’s oldest major has arrived in Hoylake at Royal Liverpool, but what makes this tournament, and in particularly links golf, so special?

Firstly, it’s unpredictable. US Open Champion Martin Kaymer recently said that “there’s never really a standard gold shot” on the links, and that’s true. The many factors of links, means each day can be different, and knowing the course is key.

Open Contender and current World Number One Adam Scott certainly knows this. Before the tournament he played five full practice rounds on the Wirral course before teeing off on Thursday, and would certainly be worth backing as a British Open champion with a Betdaq free bet, following his intense preparations.

Preparation is vital, but the uncertainty of weather along the coast can make it a nightmare for golfers, but incredibly exciting for fans.

The wind is of course a major problem to overcome, and this is perhaps why the Open is considered the most prestigious major of all, because it requires a heck of a lot of skill. Players need to control ball flight and spin in order to keep it as low as possible and out of the breeze, something of which was typified by Tom Watson in the late 70s and early 80s going on to win five Claret Jugs.

In essence, right across the course links play requires more skill, more understanding, and certainly more patience. Rory McIlroy grew up on links as a youngster, so it’s no surprise to see him lead the pack in the early stages at Hoylake, whilst others who have learnt their trade on the British courses have seen success in the last few years including Darren Clarke and Padraig Harrington.

It’s a favourite for those with a solid short game, and for those wanting to improve theirs. Typically built on sand dunes and often very large, it can often leave a tough task when you’ve finally made the green, with run off areas cut very short, making a mountain out of even the tiniest of errors.

Throughout the courses the beauty of playing links golf is the challenges the tiniest errors leave you. It’s difficult to get a pretty round as the wind blazes in from the ocean, but like any sport – you can’t help admire the touch of class, talent, and sheer skill that sees a player through adversity.

 

Why Links Golf Courses are the Best to Play

Puma Representation at the 2014 Majors

Puma Representation at the Masters

Nike have Tiger and Rory, Oakley have Bubba and Zach, Hugo Boss have Martin Kaymer and even Adidas Ashworth have Justin Rose; leaving Puma Golf as one of the only major brands who do not currently have a major winner on their books. However, that could all change in the very near future as the likes of Jonas Blixt and Graham DeLaet are beginning to bolster their major winning potential which, in turn, also eases the pressure on Rickie Fowler who had been relied upon for so long by this German powerhouse of a golf brand.

Jonas Blixt

Jonas Blixt has been part of Puma Golf for three years now and having signed a long-term contract extension in 2013, he looks set to remain with the brand which he fits in so perfectly with. A bit more elaborate, a bit more eccentric, a bit more fun – the Puma Golf brand know how to set themselves apart from the crowd and Blixt is now an integral part of the  brand’s repertoire. Two professional tour victories and some stellar performances on the big stage (4th at the US PGA Championship 2013, T2 at the US Masters 2014) certainly add weight to the argument that Jonas Blixt has the game, the nerve and the composure for the biggest occasions.

Even at the European Tour’s flagship event last week, Jonas was always somewhere around the top of the BMW PGA Championship leaderboard. It would also appear that he loves coming back to Europe to play with a T26 finish at The Open in 2013 followed by a 2nd place at the Nordea Masters in Sweden, too. Jonas has also been confirmed for the 2014 Scottish Open at Royal Aberdeen, which is due to be played just a week before the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool, and it would be difficult not to consider Jonas for a top five finish at either of these events in the UK this Summer.

Rickie Fowler

Equally so, not many will be able to discount Rickie Fowler from the running at the 143rd Open Championship, either. Managing T10, T19 and T5 finishes in three of his last four majors – Rickie Fowler is another who loves the big stage and will relish the opportunities provided by the Hoylake links course. The only blemish on Fowler’s Open record was at Muirfield last year; T14, T5 and T31 finishes in his other three appearances confirm that his daring and creative game is perfectly suited to links golf.  It has also been well documented that Rickie has been working closely with Butch Harmon this season and with some slight inconsistency still apparent; it is only a matter of time before it all comes together and culminates in a major victory.

For the latest tournament golf scripts and Puma golf style guides visit Golfposer.

Graham DeLaet

Graham DeLaet is another strong prospect for a major championship title. Having signed with the brand in January of this year, the Canadian has not necessarily shown great form in his only two major starts but several second place finishes on the PGA Tour would seriously suggest he is a player out of the top drawer. Even if he doesn’t quite manage to contend at the four majors, he is incredibly marketable and wears the Puma Golf brand superbly well – both of which will further reduce the pressure and retract some of the attention away from Rickie Fowler on the major stage. The US Open at Pinehurst is the next major on the 2014 calendar with the Open at Royal Liverpool soon after; it will be very interesting to see whether a Puma Golf athlete can finally fulfil their major winning potential.